Week Ten | Index

President Trump:

  • Signs executive order easing restrictions on fossil fuels, calling upon EPA head and climate-change denier Scott Pruitt to dismantle the Clean Power Plan, a move that will likely do little to restore coal jobs or achieve further energy independence.
  • Takes credit for Obama-era grant of $100+m to Detroit to improve its water systems.
  • Continues his attack against sanctuary cities; Newark mayor Ras Baraka says the Trump administration’s threat to withhold federal funds is an attempt to intimidate city officials into becoming “fugitive slave catchers.”
  • Claims that if China won’t take care of North Korea, he will.

In other news,

  • The House passes a bill to allow internet providers to sell your browsing history without your permission. Having already passed the Senate, this legislation is on its way to Trump’s desk.
  • House Democrats–and citizens across the country–call for Devin Nunes, leader of House Russia inquiry, to recuse himself, and for an independent investigation to commence.
  • Trump’s former National Security Advisor and paid foreign agent Gen. Michael Flynn has offered to testify in the Russia investigation in exchange for immunity from prosecution. Ranking House Intelligence Committee member Adam Schiff (D-CA) says he regards Flynn’s offer with “a healthy skepticism.”
  • News sources replay Flynn’s 2016 comments about immunity as existing only for those who’ve broken laws. Good times.
  • Senate investigation begins, promising hopes of slightly more objectivity and rigor than its House counterpart.
  • The Affordable Care Act repeal apparently returns to the GOP legislative agenda after pressure from hardline conservatives.
  • ICE is stepping up its raids yet further, and is now targeting people en route to greencard and other immigration appointments. Not a great way to encourage legal immigration.
  • By a 50-49 vote, Senate Republicans overturn an Obama-era regulation that lets states create retirement accounts for low-income workers whose employers did not provide them. Let’s see how that plays come re-election time.
  • Senate Republicans aim for confirmation vote on Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch next week; Democrats work to amass votes to block Gorsuch’s confirmation, thus triggering the dreaded “nuclear option” that would enable his confirmation with fewer votes. A fine thing for the GOP now, but it could come back to bite them later.
  • It is revealed that Fox has paid out over $13 million to settle harassment suits against Bill O’Reilly over the years. Stay classy, Fox.

Elsewhere,

  • Over 200 civilians die in US-led airstrikes in Mosul, amidst fears that Trump is calling for over-hasty military responses as a show of political power.
  • Shocking news from Chechnya of mass arrests and killings of gay men. “You cannot arrest or repress people who just don’t exist in the republic,” says Chechen leader.
  • UK Prime Minister triggers Article 50, formally commencing Britain’s departure from the EU.
  • Tensions between Russia and Ukraine threaten to boil over in advance of this year’s Eurovision. If you don’t know what Eurovision is, you should: geopolitics interpreted in pop ballads.

Week Nine | Readings

Better late than never. As Sunday draws to a close, light a fire, grab a whiskey and tuck in for a few good reads.

  • Finally, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), ranking Intelligence Committee member, lays down with remarkable clarity the reasons for the House investigation into Russian collusion and interference. Watch it in full, and then keep pushing for an independent investigation:

Week Nine | Index

Sorry for the delayed posts. Between a busy work week and everything else, sometimes a little extra processing time is called for. Trevor Noah has a new Daily Show segment called “Ain’t Nobody Got Time for That,” in which he whizzes through all of the crazy events that happened that day and reminds us that, in normal times, each would be a huge story. The Index serves a similar purpose, except we’re cramming a whole week in. So here goes.

  • In the biggest news of the week, a rushed vote on TrumpRyanCare is pulled after the GOP cannot amass sufficient GOP support to pass it. With only 17% of Americans endorsing it, it became a political hot potato, and despite last-minute, late-night, backroom dealmaking (including promises to axe mandatory benefits like maternity, ER, and mental health care), neither the Freedom Caucus nor some moderate Republicans come on board en masse. Trump and Ryan both give press conferences blaming the Democrats and everyone but themselves.Democrats rejoice. Ryan pledges to fight on, and then presumably hits the gym for some anger-cardio. Pump it!
  • The Senate passes bill allowing Internet service providers to sell people’s info (including browsing histories and even emails) without asking permission first.
  • Supreme Court justice nominee Neil Gorsuch completes three grueling days of Senate confirmation hearings in which the Democrats asked hardball questions about how he might vote in certain circumstances, which Gorsuch studiously avoids answering, and in which GOP-ers ask largely softball questions, such as (literally), “Would you rather fight 100 duck-sized horses or one horse-sized duck?” (Gorsuch demurs.) Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) asks Senate Democrats to join him in voting against Gorsuch nomination, thus likely forcing Republicans to deploy the “nuclear option” to get their candidate confirmed.
  • The House Intelligence Committee continues hearing testimony about Russian interference–and possible Trump administration collusion–with the 2016 election. High-/lowlights include an outstandingly clear introduction to the investigation by Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA: worth a watch in full); FBI Director James Comey’s testimony that there is no evidence to support Trump’s wiretapping claims; his confirmation that the FBI is conducting an investigation into Trump campaign collusion with Russia; committee head Rep. Devin Nunes taking new evidence first to Trump and then to the press corps instead of sharing it with his committee, thus casting further doubt on the independence of the hearings; and Nunes then taking the committee behind closed doors, to the outrage of Democrats on the committee and the general public. Rumors that Michael Flynn may have struck a deal with the FBI start circulating.

Donald Trump:

  • Promises to let Obamacare self-destruct, which may mean defunding it in his new budget proposals, thus opening the door to a new GOP plan.
  • After his second Muslim-ban is ordered halted, orders that no computers or tablets be brought into the cabin on non-US carrier flights from eight Muslim-majority countries, including key allies.
  • Calls Russian hearing developments “fake news.” Yawn.

Elsewhere:

  • A terror attack on Westminster Bridge and at the Houses of Parliament in London leaves five people, and the attacker, dead, and scores injured.
  • ICE raids and deportations continue.
  • Israeli police arrest an Israeli-American teen in connection to a wave of bomb threats against Jewish community centers in the U.S.
  • Conservative pundit Tomi Lahren is suspended from Fox News, likely because she said she is pro-choice.
  • Chuck Berry dies; later the same week, his estate releases a new Chuck Berry record with new material.
  • North Korea tests a new rocket engine–again.
  • Germany votes for a law that would pay restitution and clear the records of gay men imprisoned for homosexuality in the decades after World War II.
  • A lawsuit is filed against Saudi Arabia by 9/11 victims and their families, setting a worry precedent that may come back to bite the U.S.

And in other news,

  • South African footballer, upon being deemed player of the day, on live t.v. thanks “my wife and my girlfriend… I mean my wife.”
  • The OED Word of the Day on Friday is “phatic.” Hey, D.T., look it up. It’s gonna be great.